Shay Totten

writer, social media nerd, collector of manual typewriters & fence viewer

benningtoncollege:

It was an incredible Family + Reunion weekend. These are some of the highlights. Enjoy, Bennington.

Great video - post more!

Generation X’s journey from jaded to sated

thewildernessofwish:

I’ve worked with a handful of special indy publishers for the shop but the new releases from Vermont’s @ChelseaGreen always take me further than I normally wander - and I’m already pretty far out. Here’s what they’ve got coming this fall: Keeping a Family Cow: The Complete Guide for Home-Scale, Holistic Dairy Producers + The Sugarmaker’s Companion: An Integrated Approach to Producing Syrup from Maple, Birch, and Walnut Trees.

bookriot:

Movies starring books are the best movies. Here are 17 of them!

bookriot:

Movies starring books are the best movies. Here are 17 of them!

Ruth Franklin: An open letter to a few good magazine editors; or, "I'm mad as hell and I'm not gonna take it anymore"

Dear Jim, Scott, Graydon, Hugo, Josh, and Adam:

I hope you don’t mind that I’m calling you by your first names, even though I know only one of you. (Josh and I go way back.) I realize I could have just said, “Hey guys!” which, come to think of it, really makes my point for me. But I wanted this…

explore-blog:


When André was 12, he was already over 6 feet tall and weighed 240 pounds. He was too big to fit on the local school bus and his family didn’t have the money to buy a car that could deal with his weight if it drove him to and from school.

Samuel Beckett, Nobel Prize winner (literature) and esteemed playwright, probably most noted for Waiting for Godot, bought some land in 1953 near a hamlet around forty miles northeast of Paris and built a cottage for himself with the help of some locals. One of the locals that helped him build the cottage was a Bulgarian-born farmer named Boris Rousimoff, who Beckett befriended and would sometimes play cards with. As you might’ve been able to guess, Rousimoff’s son was André the Giant, and when Beckett found out that Rousimoff was having trouble getting his son to school, Beckett offered to drive André to school in his truck — a vehicle that could fit André — to repay Rousimoff for helping to build Beckett’s cottage. Adorably, when André recounted the drives with Beckett, he revealed they rarely talked about anything other than cricket.

Who knew

explore-blog:

When André was 12, he was already over 6 feet tall and weighed 240 pounds. He was too big to fit on the local school bus and his family didn’t have the money to buy a car that could deal with his weight if it drove him to and from school.

Samuel Beckett, Nobel Prize winner (literature) and esteemed playwright, probably most noted for Waiting for Godot, bought some land in 1953 near a hamlet around forty miles northeast of Paris and built a cottage for himself with the help of some locals. One of the locals that helped him build the cottage was a Bulgarian-born farmer named Boris Rousimoff, who Beckett befriended and would sometimes play cards with. As you might’ve been able to guess, Rousimoff’s son was André the Giant, and when Beckett found out that Rousimoff was having trouble getting his son to school, Beckett offered to drive André to school in his truck — a vehicle that could fit André — to repay Rousimoff for helping to build Beckett’s cottage. Adorably, when André recounted the drives with Beckett, he revealed they rarely talked about anything other than cricket.

Who knew

(Source: , via explore-blog)

motherjones:

While doing research for our cool new feature on heritage apples, we found this 100-year-old book—still the definitive resource for New England apple enthusiasts. It’s chock full of info and these gorgeous, gorgeous illustrations. We had to share! Especially after tracking down a physical copy in a small library tucked in a San Francisco warehouse.

Read the story and see all of the photos here.

Allan Savory: How to green the desert and reverse climate change

luckypeach:

Here’s the cover of the next issue. It’ll be arriving in mailboxes and bookstores over the next couple weeks. Inside you’ll find a massive interview with a little-known writer named Michael Pollan, a comic collaboration from Tony Bourdain and Tim Lane, stories of werebeavers, and all manner of strangeness and grossness you expect from us taken to apocalyptic extremes. Issues will be available at all your favorite stores that sell printed things. Or you could cop a copy direct from us here. Oh, yeah, I guess I should note: we’re gonna try to tumblr here regularly, so feel free to follow. We’re also on instagram and twitter. And facebook, but seriously, I do not have any idea how that thing works. pfm

luckypeach:

Here’s the cover of the next issue. It’ll be arriving in mailboxes and bookstores over the next couple weeks. Inside you’ll find a massive interview with a little-known writer named Michael Pollan, a comic collaboration from Tony Bourdain and Tim Lane, stories of werebeavers, and all manner of strangeness and grossness you expect from us taken to apocalyptic extremes.

Issues will be available at all your favorite stores that sell printed things. Or you could cop a copy direct from us here.

Oh, yeah, I guess I should note: we’re gonna try to tumblr here regularly, so feel free to follow. We’re also on instagram and twitter. And facebook, but seriously, I do not have any idea how that thing works.

pfm

Life on a Vermont commune: Poet Verandah Porche remembers back-to-the land living

If only I was old enough to remember my days on a Vermont commune. Lived at Earth Peoples Park when I was 3.

Natalie Merchant - Kind & Generous

literaryjukebox:

There are several kinds of love. One is a selfish, mean, grasping, egotistical thing which uses love for self-importance. This is the ugly and crippling kind. The other is an outpouring of everything good in you — of kindness and consideration and respect — not only the social respect of manners but the greater respect which is recognition of another person as unique and valuable. The first kind can make you sick and small and weak but the second can release in you strength, and courage and goodness and even wisdom you didn’t know you had.

John Steinbeck in Steinbeck: A Life in Letters

Song: “Kind & Generous” by Natalie Merchant

iTunes :: Amazon :: Back to Brain Pickings

Ignoring a War  | American Journalism Review

Independent Publisher Chelsea Green Flourishing as Employee-Owned Company

A great overview of our transition to an employee-owned company and the effect it’s had on our work culture and focus on the future.

cartoonstudies:

Giving these away free at our Holiday Open House on December 7th!

cartoonstudies:

Giving these away free at our Holiday Open House on December 7th!

upwithchris:

Washington seems obsessed with the deficit, and is focused almost exclusively on spending cuts. But new taxes on things like carbon or financial transactions could cover the entirety of the cuts lawmakers say are needed to reduce the deficit.
A carbon tax, for example, could generate $1.2 trillion over ten years, which could,by itself, pay for the entirety of the sequester cuts that will take place on January 1st.
And a tax on financial transactions could generate $350 billion over nine years, which would surpass the projected savings from cuts to Medicare by President Obama last year, which would amount to only $320 billion.

upwithchris:

Washington seems obsessed with the deficit, and is focused almost exclusively on spending cuts. But new taxes on things like carbon or financial transactions could cover the entirety of the cuts lawmakers say are needed to reduce the deficit.

A carbon tax, for example, could generate $1.2 trillion over ten years, which could,by itself, pay for the entirety of the sequester cuts that will take place on January 1st.

And a tax on financial transactions could generate $350 billion over nine years, which would surpass the projected savings from cuts to Medicare by President Obama last year, which would amount to only $320 billion.

(Source: upwithsteve, via bostonreview)